What Is A Stop-Loss In Forex Trading? And How Do You Set It?

New to Trading? Here's some tips

So there seems to be a lot of new people on this sub. And makes sense if you have questions a lot of time you'll turn to reddit for the answers (I know I do). Well here are some tips that I think would benefit new traders.
  1. Don't trade ANY Euro pairs. Look I know it's the most traded pair it goes up and down really fast and there's so much potential for you to make money. Turns out there's even more for you to lose money. It's way too volatile specially if you don't know what you're doing. EUUSD is the worst offender.
  2. Trade the Daily. Might think you're cool looking at charts every x amount of times during the day. You get to tell your friends and family that you trade all day and they might be impressed at what you're doing but unless you have some years under you stick to the daily. There's less noise. You can see clearer trends and when you don't stare at the screen all day you're less emotional therefore a more effective trader. I only look at the chart 15 minutes a day to either enter close or manage my trades. Whatever happens when I'm gone is what happens.
  3. There is no holy grail indicator Look for it all you want. It doesn't exist. There are good indicators. There are bad indicators. There are some indicators that are so broken if you do the opposite of what they're intended for you'll actually make a profit. But the fact remains that there's no perfect one. Stop looking. What you should be looking for is an indicator that fits with your strategy.
  4. What currencies to pick. I actually never see this brought up. The notion in forex is that all pairs can be traded equally. To a certain extent that's not false. But until you get the hang of it stick to a strict trading diet. Look for pairs that trend a lot. Duh look for the trend I can hear you say. When I say trend I don't mean a couple of days or weeks. I mean a couple of months. Half a year. Pairs that do that have a higher tendency to stick with one direction for a while. That's where you make your money. An easy way to identify those pairs as well is putting together a volatile currency (USD) with a less volatile one(JPY).
  5. USE YOUR SL Trust me even if not putting a SL has netted you all kinds of gains eventually the market will turn around and bite you. With no safety net you'll lose most if not all your profit. The best offense is a good defense.
  6. How to pick your TP and SL level. Most new traders care so much about that. I put it near the bottom because in my opinion you should know everything listed first. This is my opinion and I use it for my strategy I use the ATR(average true range) indicator. It's a really helpful tool that helps you identify the range at which the candles will either rise or fall. Obviously you want to set your TP inside of that range and your SL slightly outside of it.
  7. Lot sizes. Everyone has a different story about how they pick their lot size. The general consensus is don't risk over 2% of your account. But I'm a simple man and I can't be bothered to figure out what my risk is every single time. So what I do is I put $0.10 for every $100 I have on the account. I then assign $300(minimum) to each pair. That's $0.30 per pair. It's easy to remember. 10 cent for every $100. If you're able to blow $100 with $0.10 then you probably shouldn't trade.
  8. How to avoid reversals. Tbh you can't. There's no way to predict the future so eventually you'll get hit by one. What you can do however is minimize the blow. How I do it is for every pair I take two trades. If you remember in the previous tip is said I do about$0.30 per pair well I divide it 2:1. I take one trade with a TP(2) and one without (1). If my TP is hit I pocket that amount and if the trend keeps going in my direction I make even more. If the trend decides to end or reverses my losses are minimal because at least I kept half.
  9. There is NO right way to trade. Stop listening to people telling the best way to trade is fundamentals or naked charts of to use some specific indicator. There are no right way to do this. It's as flexible and unlimited as your imagination. I personally use indicators but if that's not your thing do YOU! Just remember to manage your trades properly and be level headed when trading. Hell if your trading strategy is flipping a coin with proper trade management you'd probably make some money (don't quote me on that).
  10. Trade money you're willing to lose Don't trade your rent money.
That's all I have for now. If anyone sees this and wants to add more feel free. Hope this helps someone.
submitted by MannyTrade to Forex [link] [comments]

Former investment bank FX trader: Risk management part II

Former investment bank FX trader: Risk management part II
Firstly, thanks for the overwhelming comments and feedback. Genuinely really appreciated. I am pleased 500+ of you find it useful.
If you didn't read the first post you can do so here: risk management part I. You'll need to do so in order to make sense of the topic.
As ever please comment/reply below with questions or feedback and I'll do my best to get back to you.
Part II
  • Letting stops breathe
  • When to change a stop
  • Entering and exiting winning positions
  • Risk:reward ratios
  • Risk-adjusted returns

Letting stops breathe

We talked earlier about giving a position enough room to breathe so it is not stopped out in day-to-day noise.
Let’s consider the chart below and imagine you had a trailing stop. It would be super painful to miss out on the wider move just because you left a stop that was too tight.

Imagine being long and stopped out on a meaningless retracement ... ouch!
One simple technique is simply to look at your chosen chart - let’s say daily bars. And then look at previous trends and use the measuring tool. Those generally look something like this and then you just click and drag to measure.
For example if we wanted to bet on a downtrend on the chart above we might look at the biggest retracement on the previous uptrend. That max drawdown was about 100 pips or just under 1%. So you’d want your stop to be able to withstand at least that.
If market conditions have changed - for example if CVIX has risen - and daily ranges are now higher you should incorporate that. If you know a big event is coming up you might think about that, too. The human brain is a remarkable tool and the power of the eye-ball method is not to be dismissed. This is how most discretionary traders do it.
There are also more analytical approaches.
Some look at the Average True Range (ATR). This attempts to capture the volatility of a pair, typically averaged over a number of sessions. It looks at three separate measures and takes the largest reading. Think of this as a moving average of how much a pair moves.
For example, below shows the daily move in EURUSD was around 60 pips before spiking to 140 pips in March. Conditions were clearly far more volatile in March. Accordingly, you would need to leave your stop further away in March and take a correspondingly smaller position size.

ATR is available on pretty much all charting systems
Professional traders tend to use standard deviation as a measure of volatility instead of ATR. There are advantages and disadvantages to both. Averages are useful but can be misleading when regimes switch (see above chart).
Once you have chosen a measure of volatility, stop distance can then be back-tested and optimised. For example does 2x ATR work best or 5x ATR for a given style and time horizon?
Discretionary traders may still eye-ball the ATR or standard deviation to get a feeling for how it has changed over time and what ‘normal’ feels like for a chosen study period - daily, weekly, monthly etc.

Reasons to change a stop

As a general rule you should be disciplined and not change your stops. Remember - losers average losers. This is really hard at first and we’re going to look at that in more detail later.
There are some good reasons to modify stops but they are rare.
One reason is if another risk management process demands you stop trading and close positions. We’ll look at this later. In that case just close out your positions at market and take the loss/gains as they are.
Another is event risk. If you have some big upcoming data like Non Farm Payrolls that you know can move the market +/- 150 pips and you have no edge going into the release then many traders will take off or scale down their positions. They’ll go back into the positions when the data is out and the market has quietened down after fifteen minutes or so. This is a matter of some debate - many traders consider it a coin toss and argue you win some and lose some and it all averages out.
Trailing stops can also be used to ‘lock in’ profits. We looked at those before. As the trade moves in your favour (say up if you are long) the stop loss ratchets with it. This means you may well end up ‘stopping out’ at a profit - as per the below example.

The mighty trailing stop loss order
It is perfectly reasonable to have your stop loss move in the direction of PNL. This is not exposing you to more risk than you originally were comfortable with. It is taking less and less risk as the trade moves in your favour. Trend-followers in particular love trailing stops.
One final question traders ask is what they should do if they get stopped out but still like the trade. Should they try the same trade again a day later for the same reasons? Nope. Look for a different trade rather than getting emotionally wed to the original idea.
Let’s say a particular stock looked cheap based on valuation metrics yesterday, you bought, it went down and you got stopped out. Well, it is going to look even better on those same metrics today. Maybe the market just doesn’t respect value at the moment and is driven by momentum. Wait it out.
Otherwise, why even have a stop in the first place?

Entering and exiting winning positions

Take profits are the opposite of stop losses. They are also resting orders, left with the broker, to automatically close your position if it reaches a certain price.
Imagine I’m long EURUSD at 1.1250. If it hits a previous high of 1.1400 (150 pips higher) I will leave a sell order to take profit and close the position.
The rookie mistake on take profits is to take profit too early. One should start from the assumption that you will win on no more than half of your trades. Therefore you will need to ensure that you win more on the ones that work than you lose on those that don’t.

Sad to say but incredibly common: retail traders often take profits way too early
This is going to be the exact opposite of what your emotions want you to do. We are going to look at that in the Psychology of Trading chapter.
Remember: let winners run. Just like stops you need to know in advance the level where you will close out at a profit. Then let the trade happen. Don’t override yourself and let emotions force you to take a small profit. A classic mistake to avoid.
The trader puts on a trade and it almost stops out before rebounding. As soon as it is slightly in the money they spook and cut out, instead of letting it run to their original take profit. Do not do this.

Entering positions with limit orders

That covers exiting a position but how about getting into one?
Take profits can also be left speculatively to enter a position. Sometimes referred to as “bids” (buy orders) or “offers” (sell orders). Imagine the price is 1.1250 and the recent low is 1.1205.
You might wish to leave a bid around 1.2010 to enter a long position, if the market reaches that price. This way you don’t need to sit at the computer and wait.
Again, typically traders will use tech analysis to identify attractive levels. Again - other traders will cluster with your orders. Just like the stop loss we need to bake that in.
So this time if we know everyone is going to buy around the recent low of 1.1205 we might leave the take profit bit a little bit above there at 1.1210 to ensure it gets done. Sure it costs 5 more pips but how mad would you be if the low was 1.1207 and then it rallied a hundred points and you didn’t have the trade on?!
There are two more methods that traders often use for entering a position.
Scaling in is one such technique. Let’s imagine that you think we are in a long-term bulltrend for AUDUSD but experiencing a brief retracement. You want to take a total position of 500,000 AUD and don’t have a strong view on the current price action.
You might therefore leave a series of five bids of 100,000. As the price moves lower each one gets hit. The nice thing about scaling in is it reduces pressure on you to pick the perfect level. Of course the risk is that not all your orders get hit before the price moves higher and you have to trade at-market.
Pyramiding is the second technique. Pyramiding is for take profits what a trailing stop loss is to regular stops. It is especially common for momentum traders.

Pyramiding into a position means buying more as it goes in your favour
Again let’s imagine we’re bullish AUDUSD and want to take a position of 500,000 AUD.
Here we add 100,000 when our first signal is reached. Then we add subsequent clips of 100,000 when the trade moves in our favour. We are waiting for confirmation that the move is correct.
Obviously this is quite nice as we humans love trading when it goes in our direction. However, the drawback is obvious: we haven’t had the full amount of risk on from the start of the trend.
You can see the attractions and drawbacks of both approaches. It is best to experiment and choose techniques that work for your own personal psychology as these will be the easiest for you to stick with and build a disciplined process around.

Risk:reward and win ratios

Be extremely skeptical of people who claim to win on 80% of trades. Most traders will win on roughly 50% of trades and lose on 50% of trades. This is why risk management is so important!
Once you start keeping a trading journal you’ll be able to see how the win/loss ratio looks for you. Until then, assume you’re typical and that every other trade will lose money.
If that is the case then you need to be sure you make more on the wins than you lose on the losses. You can see the effect of this below.

A combination of win % and risk:reward ratio determine if you are profitable
A typical rule of thumb is that a ratio of 1:3 works well for most traders.
That is, if you are prepared to risk 100 pips on your stop you should be setting a take profit at a level that would return you 300 pips.
One needn’t be religious about these numbers - 11 pips and 28 pips would be perfectly fine - but they are a guideline.
Again - you should still use technical analysis to find meaningful chart levels for both the stop and take profit. Don’t just blindly take your stop distance and do 3x the pips on the other side as your take profit. Use the ratio to set approximate targets and then look for a relevant resistance or support level in that kind of region.

Risk-adjusted returns

Not all returns are equal. Suppose you are examining the track record of two traders. Now, both have produced a return of 14% over the year. Not bad!
The first trader, however, made hundreds of small bets throughout the year and his cumulative PNL looked like the left image below.
The second trader made just one bet — he sold CADJPY at the start of the year — and his PNL looked like the right image below with lots of large drawdowns and volatility.
Would you rather have the first trading record or the second?
If you were investing money and betting on who would do well next year which would you choose? Of course all sensible people would choose the first trader. Yet if you look only at returns one cannot distinguish between the two. Both are up 14% at that point in time. This is where the Sharpe ratio helps .
A high Sharpe ratio indicates that a portfolio has better risk-adjusted performance. One cannot sensibly compare returns without considering the risk taken to earn that return.
If I can earn 80% of the return of another investor at only 50% of the risk then a rational investor should simply leverage me at 2x and enjoy 160% of the return at the same level of risk.
This is very important in the context of Execution Advisor algorithms (EAs) that are popular in the retail community. You must evaluate historic performance by its risk-adjusted return — not just the nominal return. Incidentally look at the Sharpe ratio of ones that have been live for a year or more ...
Otherwise an EA developer could produce two EAs: the first simply buys at 1000:1 leverage on January 1st ; and the second sells in the same manner. At the end of the year, one of them will be discarded and the other will look incredible. Its risk-adjusted return, however, would be abysmal and the odds of repeated success are similarly poor.

Sharpe ratio

The Sharpe ratio works like this:
  • It takes the average returns of your strategy;
  • It deducts from these the risk-free rate of return i.e. the rate anyone could have got by investing in US government bonds with very little risk;
  • It then divides this total return by its own volatility - the more smooth the return the higher and better the Sharpe, the more volatile the lower and worse the Sharpe.
For example, say the return last year was 15% with a volatility of 10% and US bonds are trading at 2%. That gives (15-2)/10 or a Sharpe ratio of 1.3. As a rule of thumb a Sharpe ratio of above 0.5 would be considered decent for a discretionary retail trader. Above 1 is excellent.
You don’t really need to know how to calculate Sharpe ratios. Good trading software will do this for you. It will either be available in the system by default or you can add a plug-in.

VAR

VAR is another useful measure to help with drawdowns. It stands for Value at Risk. Normally people will use 99% VAR (conservative) or 95% VAR (aggressive). Let’s say you’re long EURUSD and using 95% VAR. The system will look at the historic movement of EURUSD. It might spit out a number of -1.2%.

A 5% VAR of -1.2% tells you you should expect to lose 1.2% on 5% of days, whilst 95% of days should be better than that
This means it is expected that on 5 days out of 100 (hence the 95%) the portfolio will lose 1.2% or more. This can help you manage your capital by taking appropriately sized positions. Typically you would look at VAR across your portfolio of trades rather than trade by trade.
Sharpe ratios and VAR don’t give you the whole picture, though. Legendary fund manager, Howard Marks of Oaktree, notes that, while tools like VAR and Sharpe ratios are helpful and absolutely necessary, the best investors will also overlay their own judgment.
Investors can calculate risk metrics like VaR and Sharpe ratios (we use them at Oaktree; they’re the best tools we have), but they shouldn’t put too much faith in them. The bottom line for me is that risk management should be the responsibility of every participant in the investment process, applying experience, judgment and knowledge of the underlying investments.Howard Marks of Oaktree Capital
What he’s saying is don’t misplace your common sense. Do use these tools as they are helpful. However, you cannot fully rely on them. Both assume a normal distribution of returns. Whereas in real life you get “black swans” - events that should supposedly happen only once every thousand years but which actually seem to happen fairly often.
These outlier events are often referred to as “tail risk”. Don’t make the mistake of saying “well, the model said…” - overlay what the model is telling you with your own common sense and good judgment.

Coming up in part III

Available here
Squeezes and other risks
Market positioning
Bet correlation
Crap trades, timeouts and monthly limits

***
Disclaimer:This content is not investment advice and you should not place any reliance on it. The views expressed are the author's own and should not be attributed to any other person, including their employer.
submitted by getmrmarket to Forex [link] [comments]

H1 Backtest of ParallaxFX's BBStoch system

Disclaimer: None of this is financial advice. I have no idea what I'm doing. Please do your own research or you will certainly lose money. I'm not a statistician, data scientist, well-seasoned trader, or anything else that would qualify me to make statements such as the below with any weight behind them. Take them for the incoherent ramblings that they are.
TL;DR at the bottom for those not interested in the details.
This is a bit of a novel, sorry about that. It was mostly for getting my own thoughts organized, but if even one person reads the whole thing I will feel incredibly accomplished.

Background

For those of you not familiar, please see the various threads on this trading system here. I can't take credit for this system, all glory goes to ParallaxFX!
I wanted to see how effective this system was at H1 for a couple of reasons: 1) My current broker is TD Ameritrade - their Forex minimum is a mini lot, and I don't feel comfortable enough yet with the risk to trade mini lots on the higher timeframes(i.e. wider pip swings) that ParallaxFX's system uses, so I wanted to see if I could scale it down. 2) I'm fairly impatient, so I don't like to wait days and days with my capital tied up just to see if a trade is going to win or lose.
This does mean it requires more active attention since you are checking for setups once an hour instead of once a day or every 4-6 hours, but the upside is that you trade more often this way so you end up winning or losing faster and moving onto the next trade. Spread does eat more of the trade this way, but I'll cover this in my data below - it ends up not being a problem.
I looked at data from 6/11 to 7/3 on all pairs with a reasonable spread(pairs listed at bottom above the TL;DR). So this represents about 3-4 weeks' worth of trading. I used mark(mid) price charts. Spreadsheet link is below for anyone that's interested.

System Details

I'm pretty much using ParallaxFX's system textbook, but since there are a few options in his writeups, I'll include all the discretionary points here:

And now for the fun. Results!

As you can see, a higher target ended up with higher profit despite a much lower winrate. This is partially just how things work out with profit targets in general, but there's an additional point to consider in our case: the spread. Since we are trading on a lower timeframe, there is less overall price movement and thus the spread takes up a much larger percentage of the trade than it would if you were trading H4, Daily or Weekly charts. You can see exactly how much it accounts for each trade in my spreadsheet if you're interested. TDA does not have the best spreads, so you could probably improve these results with another broker.
EDIT: I grabbed typical spreads from other brokers, and turns out while TDA is pretty competitive on majors, their minors/crosses are awful! IG beats them by 20-40% and Oanda beats them 30-60%! Using IG spreads for calculations increased profits considerably (another 5% on top) and Oanda spreads increased profits massively (another 15%!). Definitely going to be considering another broker than TDA for this strategy. Plus that'll allow me to trade micro-lots, so I can be more granular(and thus accurate) with my position sizing and compounding.

A Note on Spread

As you can see in the data, there were scenarios where the spread was 80% of the overall size of the trade(the size of the confirmation candle that you draw your fibonacci retracements over), which would obviously cut heavily into your profits.
Removing any trades where the spread is more than 50% of the trade width improved profits slightly without removing many trades, but this is almost certainly just coincidence on a small sample size. Going below 40% and even down to 30% starts to cut out a lot of trades for the less-common pairs, but doesn't actually change overall profits at all(~1% either way).
However, digging all the way down to 25% starts to really make some movement. Profit at the -161.8% TP level jumps up to 37.94% if you filter out anything with a spread that is more than 25% of the trade width! And this even keeps the sample size fairly large at 187 total trades.
You can get your profits all the way up to 48.43% at the -161.8% TP level if you filter all the way down to only trades where spread is less than 15% of the trade width, however your sample size gets much smaller at that point(108 trades) so I'm not sure I would trust that as being accurate in the long term.
Overall based on this data, I'm going to only take trades where the spread is less than 25% of the trade width. This may bias my trades more towards the majors, which would mean a lot more correlated trades as well(more on correlation below), but I think it is a reasonable precaution regardless.

Time of Day

Time of day had an interesting effect on trades. In a totally predictable fashion, a vast majority of setups occurred during the London and New York sessions: 5am-12pm Eastern. However, there was one outlier where there were many setups on the 11PM bar - and the winrate was about the same as the big hours in the London session. No idea why this hour in particular - anyone have any insight? That's smack in the middle of the Tokyo/Sydney overlap, not at the open or close of either.
On many of the hour slices I have a feeling I'm just dealing with small number statistics here since I didn't have a lot of data when breaking it down by individual hours. But here it is anyway - for all TP levels, these three things showed up(all in Eastern time):
I don't have any reason to think these timeframes would maintain this behavior over the long term. They're almost certainly meaningless. EDIT: When you de-dup highly correlated trades, the number of trades in these timeframes really drops, so from this data there is no reason to think these timeframes would be any different than any others in terms of winrate.
That being said, these time frames work out for me pretty well because I typically sleep 12am-7am Eastern time. So I automatically avoid the 5am-6am timeframe, and I'm awake for the majority of this system's setups.

Moving stops up to breakeven

This section goes against everything I know and have ever heard about trade management. Please someone find something wrong with my data. I'd love for someone to check my formulas, but I realize that's a pretty insane time commitment to ask of a bunch of strangers.
Anyways. What I found was that for these trades moving stops up...basically at all...actually reduced the overall profitability.
One of the data points I collected while charting was where the price retraced back to after hitting a certain milestone. i.e. once the price hit the -61.8% profit level, how far back did it retrace before hitting the -100% profit level(if at all)? And same goes for the -100% profit level - how far back did it retrace before hitting the -161.8% profit level(if at all)?
Well, some complex excel formulas later and here's what the results appear to be. Emphasis on appears because I honestly don't believe it. I must have done something wrong here, but I've gone over it a hundred times and I can't find anything out of place.
Now, you might think exactly what I did when looking at these numbers: oof, the spread killed us there right? Because even when you move your SL to 0%, you still end up paying the spread, so it's not truly "breakeven". And because we are trading on a lower timeframe, the spread can be pretty hefty right?
Well even when I manually modified the data so that the spread wasn't subtracted(i.e. "Breakeven" was truly +/- 0), things don't look a whole lot better, and still way worse than the passive trade management method of leaving your stops in place and letting it run. And that isn't even a realistic scenario because to adjust out the spread you'd have to move your stoploss inside the candle edge by at least the spread amount, meaning it would almost certainly be triggered more often than in the data I collected(which was purely based on the fib levels and mark price). Regardless, here are the numbers for that scenario:
From a literal standpoint, what I see behind this behavior is that 44 of the 69 breakeven trades(65%!) ended up being profitable to -100% after retracing deeply(but not to the original SL level), which greatly helped offset the purely losing trades better than the partial profit taken at -61.8%. And 36 went all the way back to -161.8% after a deep retracement without hitting the original SL. Anyone have any insight into this? Is this a problem with just not enough data? It seems like enough trades that a pattern should emerge, but again I'm no expert.
I also briefly looked at moving stops to other lower levels (78.6%, 61.8%, 50%, 38.2%, 23.6%), but that didn't improve things any. No hard data to share as I only took a quick look - and I still might have done something wrong overall.
The data is there to infer other strategies if anyone would like to dig in deep(more explanation on the spreadsheet below). I didn't do other combinations because the formulas got pretty complicated and I had already answered all the questions I was looking to answer.

2-Candle vs Confirmation Candle Stops

Another interesting point is that the original system has the SL level(for stop entries) just at the outer edge of the 2-candle pattern that makes up the system. Out of pure laziness, I set up my stops just based on the confirmation candle. And as it turns out, that is much a much better way to go about it.
Of the 60 purely losing trades, only 9 of them(15%) would go on to be winners with stops on the 2-candle formation. Certainly not enough to justify the extra loss and/or reduced profits you are exposing yourself to in every single other trade by setting a wider SL.
Oddly, in every single scenario where the wider stop did save the trade, it ended up going all the way to the -161.8% profit level. Still, not nearly worth it.

Correlated Trades

As I've said many times now, I'm really not qualified to be doing an analysis like this. This section in particular.
Looking at shared currency among the pairs traded, 74 of the trades are correlated. Quite a large group, but it makes sense considering the sort of moves we're looking for with this system.
This means you are opening yourself up to more risk if you were to trade on every signal since you are technically trading with the same underlying sentiment on each different pair. For example, GBP/USD and AUD/USD moving together almost certainly means it's due to USD moving both pairs, rather than GBP and AUD both moving the same size and direction coincidentally at the same time. So if you were to trade both signals, you would very likely win or lose both trades - meaning you are actually risking double what you'd normally risk(unless you halve both positions which can be a good option, and is discussed in ParallaxFX's posts and in various other places that go over pair correlation. I won't go into detail about those strategies here).
Interestingly though, 17 of those apparently correlated trades ended up with different wins/losses.
Also, looking only at trades that were correlated, winrate is 83%/70%/55% (for the three TP levels).
Does this give some indication that the same signal on multiple pairs means the signal is stronger? That there's some strong underlying sentiment driving it? Or is it just a matter of too small a sample size? The winrate isn't really much higher than the overall winrates, so that makes me doubt it is statistically significant.
One more funny tidbit: EUCAD netted the lowest overall winrate: 30% to even the -61.8% TP level on 10 trades. Seems like that is just a coincidence and not enough data, but dang that's a sucky losing streak.
EDIT: WOW I spent some time removing correlated trades manually and it changed the results quite a bit. Some thoughts on this below the results. These numbers also include the other "What I will trade" filters. I added a new worksheet to my data to show what I ended up picking.
To do this, I removed correlated trades - typically by choosing those whose spread had a lower % of the trade width since that's objective and something I can see ahead of time. Obviously I'd like to only keep the winning trades, but I won't know that during the trade. This did reduce the overall sample size down to a level that I wouldn't otherwise consider to be big enough, but since the results are generally consistent with the overall dataset, I'm not going to worry about it too much.
I may also use more discretionary methods(support/resistance, quality of indecision/confirmation candles, news/sentiment for the pairs involved, etc) to filter out correlated trades in the future. But as I've said before I'm going for a pretty mechanical system.
This brought the 3 TP levels and even the breakeven strategies much closer together in overall profit. It muted the profit from the high R:R strategies and boosted the profit from the low R:R strategies. This tells me pair correlation was skewing my data quite a bit, so I'm glad I dug in a little deeper. Fortunately my original conclusion to use the -161.8 TP level with static stops is still the winner by a good bit, so it doesn't end up changing my actions.
There were a few times where MANY (6-8) correlated pairs all came up at the same time, so it'd be a crapshoot to an extent. And the data showed this - often then won/lost together, but sometimes they did not. As an arbitrary rule, the more correlations, the more trades I did end up taking(and thus risking). For example if there were 3-5 correlations, I might take the 2 "best" trades given my criteria above. 5+ setups and I might take the best 3 trades, even if the pairs are somewhat correlated.
I have no true data to back this up, but to illustrate using one example: if AUD/JPY, AUD/USD, CAD/JPY, USD/CAD all set up at the same time (as they did, along with a few other pairs on 6/19/20 9:00 AM), can you really say that those are all the same underlying movement? There are correlations between the different correlations, and trying to filter for that seems rough. Although maybe this is a known thing, I'm still pretty green to Forex - someone please enlighten me if so! I might have to look into this more statistically, but it would be pretty complex to analyze quantitatively, so for now I'm going with my gut and just taking a few of the "best" trades out of the handful.
Overall, I'm really glad I went further on this. The boosting of the B/E strategies makes me trust my calculations on those more since they aren't so far from the passive management like they were with the raw data, and that really had me wondering what I did wrong.

What I will trade

Putting all this together, I am going to attempt to trade the following(demo for a bit to make sure I have the hang of it, then for keeps):
Looking at the data for these rules, test results are:
I'll be sure to let everyone know how it goes!

Other Technical Details

Raw Data

Here's the spreadsheet for anyone that'd like it. (EDIT: Updated some of the setups from the last few days that have fully played out now. I also noticed a few typos, but nothing major that would change the overall outcomes. Regardless, I am currently reviewing every trade to ensure they are accurate.UPDATE: Finally all done. Very few corrections, no change to results.)
I have some explanatory notes below to help everyone else understand the spiraled labyrinth of a mind that put the spreadsheet together.

Insanely detailed spreadsheet notes

For you real nerds out there. Here's an explanation of what each column means:

Pairs

  1. AUD/CAD
  2. AUD/CHF
  3. AUD/JPY
  4. AUD/NZD
  5. AUD/USD
  6. CAD/CHF
  7. CAD/JPY
  8. CHF/JPY
  9. EUAUD
  10. EUCAD
  11. EUCHF
  12. EUGBP
  13. EUJPY
  14. EUNZD
  15. EUUSD
  16. GBP/AUD
  17. GBP/CAD
  18. GBP/CHF
  19. GBP/JPY
  20. GBP/NZD
  21. GBP/USD
  22. NZD/CAD
  23. NZD/CHF
  24. NZD/JPY
  25. NZD/USD
  26. USD/CAD
  27. USD/CHF
  28. USD/JPY

TL;DR

Based on the reasonable rules I discovered in this backtest:

Demo Trading Results

Since this post, I started demo trading this system assuming a 5k capital base and risking ~1% per trade. I've added the details to my spreadsheet for anyone interested. The results are pretty similar to the backtest when you consider real-life conditions/timing are a bit different. I missed some trades due to life(work, out of the house, etc), so that brought my total # of trades and thus overall profit down, but the winrate is nearly identical. I also closed a few trades early due to various reasons(not liking the price action, seeing support/resistance emerge, etc).
A quick note is that TD's paper trade system fills at the mid price for both stop and limit orders, so I had to subtract the spread from the raw trade values to get the true profit/loss amount for each trade.
I'm heading out of town next week, then after that it'll be time to take this sucker live!

Live Trading Results

I started live-trading this system on 8/10, and almost immediately had a string of losses much longer than either my backtest or demo period. Murphy's law huh? Anyways, that has me spooked so I'm doing a longer backtest before I start risking more real money. It's going to take me a little while due to the volume of trades, but I'll likely make a new post once I feel comfortable with that and start live trading again.
submitted by ForexBorex to Forex [link] [comments]

Questions about EA

Hi. I'm not terribly knowledgeable about Forex, but I am interested in learning. I am also interested in trading robots. I have someone who has designed a robot for me. Here is the description of the strategy it uses: The Donchian channel is taken as a basis. It doesn't work well on the flat, but it works well in the trend. To determine how to separate the flat from the trend, we can calculate the ratio of the Donchian channel to the ATR. When exiting the flat, we open a position based on the breakdown of the Donchian channel. Stop loss and take profit are set based on the channel lines. Dynamic position management is also used.
The robot he has provided does extremely well in historical backtesting. My question is twofold. Does the strategy he is describing make sense? And is it possible to set up a robot so that it does well in back testing but is unlikely to generate similar results in the future? Thanks for any help you can offer.
submitted by ssparker7 to Forex [link] [comments]

Indicators for NNFX traders

EDIT: For anyone new to NNFX (No-nonsense forex) he goes by VP and has a youtube channel where he explains how to build a systematic trading strategy, check it out if you're interested.
Not how I trade anymore, but I've collected quite a few indicators that others might want to use. These did well in my testing but I can't guarantee that they will work well for you. These are for MT4 on the daily chart, and I've given the best parameters (which were optimised for) in brackets. This is all for the NNFX strategy, meaning that I had a stop loss at 1.5x ATR and a half TP at 1x ATR.
C1/C2 (Trend indicators):
- T3_Trend_CF(32): https://www.mql5.com/en/code/7496
- Trinity_Impulse(27, 11): https://www.mql5.com/en/code/9717
- Momentum(16 zero cross)
- The_Heavy(38, 38): https://www.mql5.com/en/code/11567
- Schaff_Trend_Cycle(6, 25, 13 entry when it curves down/up): https://www.mql5.com/en/code/17700
Volume:
- Volatility Ratio(13 enter with trend when green): https://www.mql5.com/en/code/26159
- Waddah Attar Explosion(Histogram above the line): https://www.mql5.com/en/code/7051
Exit:
- Rex(44, 25 or 19, 11): https://forex-station.com/download/file.php?id=3354211&sid=4021ce6670f5aed2e5ff117d3aa541a0
- Waddah Attar Explosion(Histogram below the line):
- Trailing stop at 1.5x ATR
Baseline:
- NOT HULL, it repaints heavily
- Didn't do well using one
submitted by Shallllow to Forex [link] [comments]

Week 3 (I think) of going live (July 20-24)

Whatsup Forex,
I seem to be getting worse and worse at getting this out on time. Spent most of the time updating my journal though, so that's a bonus. Figured I'd actually give examples this time though, everyone loves pictures.
Trade 1: Pretty much text book for me. Closed the trade early because I went to bed. Currently testing on my demo account whether or not I can leave these running as I don't want to cut things short if I don't need to. This particular trade did end up getting to my TP shortly after I closed it and went to sleep.
Trade 1
Trade 2: My system works on levels. Put this trade in on a level that previously held, ended up catching too early and ended up stopping me out.
Trade 2
Trade 3: Price ran for the next level, which I took and ended up being right. Will add it into my lessons learned at the end, for education or whatever.
Trade 3
Trade 4: Bit of a hairy one, but that's why we have appropriate stop losses. Got in a little early, scraped my stop loss but didn't take me out. Ended up getting limited out which is a win.
Trade 4
Lessons learned: I use the ATR to gauge how much there's left in a day, and one thing I got out of these trades (since they're mean reversion) is to look at the level that would be closest to the full ATR for the day and then put the trade in.
Hopefully this was a little more informative than the last two posts, my bad for taking so long!
Cheers,
V.
submitted by Phluxxed to Forex [link] [comments]

To those who just started

Hey, I hope you're doing well. Forex market gives you all sorts of emotion at the start. You'll learn to not feel anything in your journey.
The reason I wrote the post is to give some tips, see I started not too long ago and found out some tips that would have saved me from blowing my account.
1) Don't bet against the market, you aren't pro yet like in the Big Short. Trade the trends.
2) Price actions matters most, technical analysis and fundamental analysis are good tools but what's telling you what is the charts.
3) Use ATR (average true range) to determine how many lots you want to allocate. Also don't forget to calculate the price per pip.
4) Don't trade on public holidays. Most heavy movers are not there so the market tend to have very high spreads. This will eat you up unless you know what you're doing and your stop loss is very strong.
5) When you have bad trade days, quit trading. Don't chase it. I know this feeling man, it sucks. But you have to accept the error and learn from it. Trade when everything is in your favor.
6) Don't get overconfident just because you're ahead! Protect your wins at all costs. Sometimes it's better not to trade. You do not have to trade daily, while the idea of making money everyday sounds cool realistically some days you will be sitting in front of screen planning your next trade.
7) This one is something you might already know, don't ever sell low and buy high. It works sometime but you are giving yourself a huge risk. And your stop loss will likely hit, basically wasting good money.
8) Take your wins, don't get too greedy. Currencies are correalated with one another, check the health of the trend if it starts slowing down you might want to take your profits.
9)Don't put too much pressure on yourself, you will get there. You will learn and be successful how you want. Don't rush, don't over trade.
That's all that I can think of. Personally, I have blown 2 live accounts with thousands in it. Right now I am seeing profits consistently, but it wasn't easy. It's hard to win back your losses, so cut them off when you can. And don't hold on to them! Never put your hard earned money hoping for someone else to move the trend. Ride the trend, respect it and enjoy your winnings.
I hope this helps you out, from the bottom of my heart. To my senior traders, please feel free to give me further advice. I am always looking to learn and improve.
Good luck and stay safe!
submitted by adric_debeatz to Forex [link] [comments]

Surge of New Forex Traders? Read this!

I've noticed that about 2,000 people have joined the Forex community in the recent weeks. Has anyone else noticed this? I suspect this is because of the lay offs due to the corona virus, and people are frantically looking for ways to supplement their incomes. While I'm glad that people are trying to better themselves and take control of their financial situations, I have to admit that the daily "newbie" questions are getting quite annoying. And it's not because there are new, inexperienced traders asking for help, but it's because the questions are more-less the same questions. I know there is a pinned "New Traders" section at the top of the thread, but it seems it isn't catching much traction.
But first, to the new traders I'd first like to say:

Welcome! This will be a tough journey, but it will pay in dividends (not literally).
A couple tips before we start:
FIRST, see the pinned New Traders section of Forex
SECOND, go to babypips and take their FREE courses where you will learn the basics. I never did because I'm an idiot, and it took me many years of trial and error to succeed in this game. Don't be a lemon like me, go to babypips.
Now my basics;
Always have at least a 1:2 Risk:Reward. Simply put, risk at least $1 for $2.
Always set a stop loss and take profit.
In the beginning, I find it best to give new traders a black or white, go-or-no-go trading strategy. Trade mechanically. While discretionary trading is profitable, you need years of experience and time in the charts to be good at it. It could be something like, "I only trade low volatility break outs on the 4hr. Any candle below x ATR and I will enter via stop order at the high/low of that candle. My sl will be at the high/low of the entry candle, and I will look to make at least 2 reward on that trade. I will risk 1% per trade, even on demo, and I will trade in the direction of a 10 period moving average" This is a VERY crude strategy, one I just pulled out of my ass, so don't go using it and blowing your accounts!
I recommend starting with 1 pair in the beginning, at MOST 3. And I recommend not swapping into different pairs. Keep those 1-3 pairs.
Once babypips is completed, demo trade. Put time in the charts and develop a strategy (mechanically, preferably). Your strategy could be as complex or as simple as you like. Simplicity is genius in my opinion, but you do you. I'm not trying to sound like an ass, but everything you really needed to learn you learned from babypips.
With that said, DO NOT pay for courses from ANYONE. They will often know the same as you, if not less. In my opinion to be really great in this game you don't need a lot of information., and capitalize on every opportunity. You just need to be really good at one style and max that the hell out. For instance, being really good at low volatility breakouts, and having a system based off that. No amount of schooling (high school, college, or courses via Forex gurus) will make you successful. It's one thing to know a strategy, but to implement it in real time with real consequences is daunting. The only way to conquer this is to simply do it. Trade.
Trade with an amount of money you can emotionally and financially afford to lose! I would even recommend starting a live account with $50 and only trading micro lots (0.01) until you become comfortable and your strategy proves successful. This is AFTER demo trading your strategy.
Master yourself before you master the markets. Work out. Feed your brain. Get enough sleep. The money you make or lose isn't worth your health.
Psychology. In my opinion the best psychology you can have while trading is a form of stoicism. You've placed your trade based off your strategy, you managed your trade based off your strategy, and you risked an amount you've told yourself you were comfortable losing with an account you told yourself you were comfortable blowing, so what's the worry? Why the second guessing? Everyone's heard that story, right? Where a man goes to a successful "guru" and says he wants to be successful. The guru says, "Ok. Show up at the beach this time tomorrow." The man shows up at the beach in a suit and tie, ready for success! The guru tells him to get in the water. Once in, the guru holds the mans head under the water, drowning him. At the last second the guru lets him up and says, "once you want success as much you wanted to breathe, you'll be successful. That's what you need to be like. You need to be willing to do what is necessary and put in the work. It's not easy. You're going to lose money, maybe even blow accounts. You may struggle for years without a return, or even lose money over that time. How bad do you want it success, though? And are you willing to drown to attain it?
Best of luck new traders!
Experienced traders, please feel free to add things or tell me I'm a goof in the comments.
submitted by SandfordKing to Forex [link] [comments]

Reading the ATR Indicator

All right, I've read multiple guides/sites/forum posts on this topic, and I'm still flummoxed. So I ask you, Forex reddit:
How do you read the ATR indicator?
For example: I'm looking at a pair with an ATR(20) of 1.2889. I want to use the ATR*1.5 method to set my stop loss. Of those five digits, which do I actually multiply to get the SL?
The answer seems simple enough for pairs with an ATR of something like 0.0045; that's just 45 pips. But I'm lost when it comes to values bigger than that, because I can't imagine a trade with a SL of, say, 4333 pips (to use my ATR(20) example), especially if I'm scaling out and intend to enter three positions.
I realize this is the most absolute of absolute rookie questions, but in all my months of doing this I've never been able to figure it out. I appreciate your help!
submitted by dangerous_beans to Forex [link] [comments]

Forex Scalping Trading Stategy

Forex Scalping Trading Stategy
Dear Traders,
My name is Ludovico and I am an associate of Horizon Trading team. Today, I would like to share with you a scalping technique that will give you an advantage in following price action fluctuations. Most importantly, this article will focus on fast timeframes trading tactics, how to spot important key levels and trigger your positions.
So, do scalping and price action go well together?
Considering that price action aims to predict what price is doing right now and where is heading, fast mindset and quick analysis become crucial; scalp trading is about the same thing. A scalp trade will take approximately 1 to 30 minutes, so to be effective and consistent in this discipline one must be reacting rapidly to price movements. Therefore, scalp requires quick analysis, quick responses and quick decisions, and at its core there is price action, which as well is all about speed and efficiency.
Now let s move on today’s topic on how to steadily understand fast trading potential earning set ups and to become a killer scalper.

What is scalping trading?

Scalping is a trading style that specialize in profiting off small price changes. It requires high level of concentration, because, due to its speed, a trader must have a strict entry exit strategy, otherwise one large loss could cancel all the many small gains in a blink of an eye.
The main features of scalping are:
Less exposure, lesser risk: A smaller exposure to price fluctuation will reduce the odds to run into adverse events.
Smaller moves are easier to forecast: Because like every market forex works on principles of supply and demands, a higher imbalance is needed to generate bigger price changes.
Smaller fluctuations are more regular than wider ones: Even in days when markets tend to less volatile, working with smaller timeframes such as (M1, M5, M15 & M30) will still grant chance of earning more frequently.
While swing trading relies on big price moves, therefore aiming for long trend following a scalper will trade that fluctuation continuously. Price action comes into play here, a solid scalp trader must be very aware of level of support and resistance and when the price could bounce off.
See image Below:

Figure 1: Support & Resistance, XAUUSD, M1, (23rd July 2019
In order to better find these areas a comparison between timeframes is necessary considering that is always advantageous to highlights the most recent zones of support & resistance (2 to 5 previous days)
Once understanding levels strategy become easier to follow, let’s find out.

Simple scalping and Horizon X scalping pattern

When trading trends continuously, important is to gauge market signals which indicate the trend is strong, opening to new potential earning scenarios for investors. When noticing price is coming back to retest important key levels forming pullbacks, a trader should always look out for entry-points.

Scalping pullbacks

Scalp traders must focus on key resistance and support level to find entry point while trading pullbacks. Here at Trading Academy we developed a system, based on fast moving price action that will enable traders to have successful daily session.
We based our method on understanding where big money players come into action and by following their liquidity volume open winning positions. Horizon X is based on several scalping price patterns which find their fundamentals in risk and money management, key levels and entry points.
See image below:

Figure 2:Scalp trading pullbacks, XAUUSD, M1, (23rd July 2019)
In the picture above I highlight the principle of trading pullbacks in M1 timeframe, this method relies on entering the market in specific hot spot key levels. Even though many traders globally do not take into consideration risk management, our vision is that while scalp trade, investors should follow clear objective rules to be effective, here is one of our coral patterns and its trade management rules.

Horizon X Pattern #3

This pattern aims to gauge momentums, big money players moves, consisting in fast formation of large body candle sticks (black bearish/white bullish)

Figure3: Pattern #3 configuration
To be formed Pattern #3 require several steps to be accomplished by the market before we can enter our position with confidence:
  • First Momentum
When price level is broken out at consolidation level big buyers make the move dragging price level on a rally, usually between 10-15 PIPS (as the image above suggests).
  1. Large candles (bodies)
  2. Mostly of one colour (back/bearish, white/bullish)
  3. Candles close its high/lows of the move
  • Consolidation Period
Within this first part price level is conditioned by the presence of many buyers on one side and sellers on the other stabilizing the price in a narrow range while building up important structure.
  1. Small candles, at least 3
  2. Greater mix between white/black or bullish/bearish candles
  • Second Momentum (breaking the price level at consolidation) – can be bearish or bullish depending on scenario)
When price level is broken out at consolidation level big buyers make the move dragging price level on a rally, usually between 10-15 PIPS (as the image above suggests).
  1. Large candles (bodies)
  2. Mostly of one colour (back/bearish, white/bullish)
  3. Candles close its high/lows of the move
  • Pullback
Price is coming back to retest level at the previous consolidation level and when fractal is formed market is giving investors hints that a good spot to open a position is coming up.
  1. Small candles, at least 3
  2. Greater mix between white/black or bullish/bearish candles

Entering the market

Pattern #3 can be traded by entering the market within the retesting price area at consolidation level, however the tactics would be based more on aggressivity of trader personality and behaviour. In this booklet we will describe the most commonly used one.
Entering in consolidation structure
Market needs more liquidity for further movement and is going deeper toward the structure taking stop losses of weak traders. Smarter investors, however, use these stop losses for their position gaining, entering the market when a fractal is formed.
See image below:

Figure 4: Pattern #3, entering market at consolidation structure, USDCHF H1 (22nd July 2019)
Entering at consolidation boarder
Price touches edges of consolidation and starts to reverse. We would like to open position when fractal is formed.
See image below:

Figure 5: Pattern #3, market entry at consolidation border, GBPUSD M1 (14th Mar 2019)
  • Entering after false break out
Severe stop-loss testing. Big players move price aggressively till the point that it breaks consolidation structure. This is a perfect situation for major traders to enter the market, pushing the price towards its original direction. We will conservatively open trade when the price level reaches back consolidation, forming a fractal.
See image below:

Figure 6: Pattern #3, market entry after false break out, GBPUSD M1 (6th June 2019)

Trade Management

Similarly, we can use 4 elementary exit strategies of our Horizon X Pattern #3.
  1. We will aim for a high structure level from higher timeframes (very good as a second take profit).
  2. For 1-minute timeframe we will take half of our position with 10 points profit as a target and put our stop-loss on break-even for the rest of the position.
  3. Our take profit is based on having ATR 80 %.
  4. Rule of safety. Our first take profit is set to risk-reward ratio 1:1 with a half of position. When the take profit is hit, we are in a risk-free position for the second target.
On the other hand, stop losses will be always places on top of the entry structure to avoid important losses which will likely vanish all the trader day effort.
submitted by Horizon_Trading to u/Horizon_Trading [link] [comments]

Stuck after 2 years. Any suggestions?

Hello everyone, I don't tend to write on Reddit but I'm getting frustrated. I will try to get straight to the point and avoid useless information.
What do you suggest me to do? or What course do you suggest me to take?
I first entered the Forex world aprox 2 years ago, but I started to take it seriously 1 year ago and I can't get profitable, most of the times I'm at breakeven and sometimes I lose more than I win, and i'm beginning to lose hope.
My strategy is a mix of "Akil stokes" and "Jason graystone" style mixed with what I learned from Navin Prythiany Price action and 4CB courses (payed courses).
I always take only trend trades for now, I first look at what we call "the big boy timeframe (higher timeframe)" and stablish the trend, then I go down a timeframe to meassure the momentum of the pullback to get in. After I get the pullback I have different entry techniques, like advance pattern formations, reactions on support/resistance (Navin style), or the simple "higher high higher close" that Graystone use.
Still my trading is bad. Can't get profitable and I dont know what to do next, I dont know how to break that barrier. I dont trade with emotions, I dont move my Stop or take profit UNLESS my rules allow me, I dont get out early, and dont hold longer that I should, I risk 2% of capital per trade (calculated before each trade), I dont revenge trade, I dont hold on weekends, I dont trade pairs with news incomming, etc etc...
I dont use indicators either, just the ATR to set my stop loss.
I would really love some suggestions, I began this month to post all my trades on Tradingview if some of you want to take a look and see how my style is (not sure if its allowed to post other sites in here).
Thank you beforehand, I really don't want to give up after all the time I've spend on this...
submitted by Koutta to Forex [link] [comments]

r/Stocks Technicals Tuesday - Dec 25, 2018

Feel free to talk about technical analysis here (not argue against it), but before you ask any question make sure you see the following information:
Technical analysis (TA) uses historical price movements, real time data, indicators based on math and/or statistics, and charts; all of which help measure the trajectory of a security. TA can also be used to interpret the actions of other market participants and predict their actions:
Measure: Is the security's price trending, has it dipped or is it a falling knife? Interpret: Does the current price mean investors think it's undervalued or overvalued; when did they buy/sell more and why? Predict: If price reaches a certain point, will there be a rally or get rejected?
The main benefit to TA is that everything shows up in the price (commonly known as priced in): All news, investor sentiment, and changes to fundamentals are reflected in a security's price.
TA is best used for short term trading, but can also be used for long term.
Intro to technical analysis by Stockcharts chartschool and their article on candlesticks
Terminology
Useful indicators
Methods or Systems
Strategies: See the TA wiki here as this will be a work in progress, feel free to reply with your own strategy.
See our past daily discussions here. Also links for: Technicals Tuesday, Options Trading Thursday, and Fundamentals Friday.
submitted by AutoModerator to stocks [link] [comments]

r/Stocks Technicals Tuesday - Nov 27, 2018

Feel free to talk about technical analysis here (not argue against it), but before you ask any question make sure you see the following information:
Technical analysis (TA) uses historical price movements, real time data, indicators based on math and/or statistics, and charts; all of which help measure the trajectory of a security. TA can also be used to interpret the actions of other market participants and predict their actions:
Measure: Is the security's price trending, has it dipped or is it a falling knife? Interpret: Does the current price mean investors think it's undervalued or overvalued; when did they buy/sell more and why? Predict: If price reaches a certain point, will there be a rally or get rejected?
The main benefit to TA is that everything shows up in the price (commonly known as priced in): All news, investor sentiment, and changes to fundamentals are reflected in a security's price.
TA is best used for short term trading, but can also be used for long term.
Intro to technical analysis by Stockcharts chartschool and their article on candlesticks
Terminology
Useful indicators
Methods or Systems
Strategies: See the TA wiki here as this will be a work in progress, feel free to reply with your own strategy.
See our past daily discussions here. Also links for: Technicals Tuesday, Options Trading Thursday, and Fundamentals Friday.
submitted by AutoModerator to stocks [link] [comments]

r/Stocks Technicals Tuesday - Dec 11, 2018

Feel free to talk about technical analysis here (not argue against it), but before you ask any question make sure you see the following information:
Technical analysis (TA) uses historical price movements, real time data, indicators based on math and/or statistics, and charts; all of which help measure the trajectory of a security. TA can also be used to interpret the actions of other market participants and predict their actions:
Measure: Is the security's price trending, has it dipped or is it a falling knife? Interpret: Does the current price mean investors think it's undervalued or overvalued; when did they buy/sell more and why? Predict: If price reaches a certain point, will there be a rally or get rejected?
The main benefit to TA is that everything shows up in the price (commonly known as priced in): All news, investor sentiment, and changes to fundamentals are reflected in a security's price.
TA is best used for short term trading, but can also be used for long term.
Intro to technical analysis by Stockcharts chartschool and their article on candlesticks
Terminology
Useful indicators
Methods or Systems
Strategies: See the TA wiki here as this will be a work in progress, feel free to reply with your own strategy.
See our past daily discussions here. Also links for: Technicals Tuesday, Options Trading Thursday, and Fundamentals Friday.
submitted by AutoModerator to stocks [link] [comments]

r/Stocks Technicals Tuesday - Dec 04, 2018

Feel free to talk about technical analysis here (not argue against it), but before you ask any question make sure you see the following information:
Technical analysis (TA) uses historical price movements, real time data, indicators based on math and/or statistics, and charts; all of which help measure the trajectory of a security. TA can also be used to interpret the actions of other market participants and predict their actions:
Measure: Is the security's price trending, has it dipped or is it a falling knife? Interpret: Does the current price mean investors think it's undervalued or overvalued; when did they buy/sell more and why? Predict: If price reaches a certain point, will there be a rally or get rejected?
The main benefit to TA is that everything shows up in the price (commonly known as priced in): All news, investor sentiment, and changes to fundamentals are reflected in a security's price.
TA is best used for short term trading, but can also be used for long term.
Intro to technical analysis by Stockcharts chartschool and their article on candlesticks
Terminology
Useful indicators
Methods or Systems
Strategies: See the TA wiki here as this will be a work in progress, feel free to reply with your own strategy.
See our past daily discussions here. Also links for: Technicals Tuesday, Options Trading Thursday, and Fundamentals Friday.
submitted by AutoModerator to stocks [link] [comments]

r/Stocks Technicals Tuesday - Dec 18, 2018

Feel free to talk about technical analysis here (not argue against it), but before you ask any question make sure you see the following information:
Technical analysis (TA) uses historical price movements, real time data, indicators based on math and/or statistics, and charts; all of which help measure the trajectory of a security. TA can also be used to interpret the actions of other market participants and predict their actions:
Measure: Is the security's price trending, has it dipped or is it a falling knife? Interpret: Does the current price mean investors think it's undervalued or overvalued; when did they buy/sell more and why? Predict: If price reaches a certain point, will there be a rally or get rejected?
The main benefit to TA is that everything shows up in the price (commonly known as priced in): All news, investor sentiment, and changes to fundamentals are reflected in a security's price.
TA is best used for short term trading, but can also be used for long term.
Intro to technical analysis by Stockcharts chartschool and their article on candlesticks
Terminology
Useful indicators
Methods or Systems
Strategies: See the TA wiki here as this will be a work in progress, feel free to reply with your own strategy.
See our past daily discussions here. Also links for: Technicals Tuesday, Options Trading Thursday, and Fundamentals Friday.
submitted by AutoModerator to stocks [link] [comments]

Top 10 Forex Trading Strategies and Recommendations that work in 2018

Forex trading is completely bounded by the economy of the currency pair. Forex trading is not a kind of business where you can take spontaneous decisions to run your business. It needs a thoughtful and strategic process with the emotional discipline to make any move in Forex trading. It is always said that a Forex trader must strive to develop his/her own trading strategy or try a strategy that has proven itself in past. Best Forex trading strategy for 2018 can develop after multifaceted analysis of currency pairs and economy news.
1. Trading is an Art, not a Rocket Science: You must remember that trading is an art, not a rocket science. No one can assure you for 100% accurate movement of any currency. Therefore, no rule in trading is ever absolute. You have to learn Art of trading. How the market reacts to the economic news? And how technical indicators work with those data?
2. Emotional Discipline: Everyone knows about emotional discipline, but no one controls their emotions while trading which becomes a reason for the loss of trading. Emotional discipline keeps you on the track of successful trader. If you are trading with a strategic process and don’t have the emotional discipline you can lose your money on trading and we suggest you stop wasting time in trading. You can do more interesting in your life.
3. Don’t Get Greedy: Forex trading is highly fluctuating trading system. You are making a good profit 1 min ago and next min you are having a loss. If you’re in profit and you are making good money with respect to your investment. Then don’t get greedy into making more profit. Just close the trade and have fun with your profit.
4. Risk Management: Most of the people trade without risk management and wipe out their account. If you want to be a successful trader don’t forget to put proper risk to management in your trades. Trading is a kind of business if you are not able to lose money that you are investing. Please don’t put any trade in stocks, currency market.
5. RSI (Relative Strength Index) Indicator: As you know it is a momentum indicator. It is used to understand the movement of the market. It also helps us to learn the trend of the market in particular time frame. But why we are suggesting to others to use in your toolkit. We know that market is run by investors and all investors need something to predict short terms and long-term movement of the market to make a good amount of profit. That’s why they use tools used by a majority of traders and RSI is one of the tools which is used by the majority.
6. ATR (Average True Range): Most of the traders lose money in Forex trading not because they are trading against the trend, they lose money because they don’t what is stop loss and take profit they have to put while trading and ATR will help you to use a proper stop loss on your all trade so you can increase the number of profitable trade in your portfolio.
7. Stochastic Oscillator Every trader must keep this tool in his/her toolkit. This tool will let you know about get-in and get-out price of your trade. If you are following the signals provided by this tool, you may lose most of your trades with good profit. It shows the overbought and oversold price of any currency, commodity, and stock. This range – from 0 to 100 – will remain constant, no matter how quickly or slowly a security advances or declines. Considering the most traditional settings for the oscillator, 20 are typically considered the oversold threshold and 80 are considered the overbought threshold. However, the levels are adjustable to fit security characteristics and analytical needs. Readings above 80 indicate a security is trading near the top of its high-low range; readings below 20 indicate the security is trading near the bottom of its high-low range.
8. Simple Moving Average: The thing to remember about SMA is it helps you to determine the upcoming trend. It helps you to know upcoming the bullish trend and bearish trends in your currency trading. Two popular trading patterns that use simple moving averages include the death cross and a golden cross. A death cross occurs when the 50-day simple moving average crosses below the 200-day moving average. This is considered a bearish signal that further losses are in store. The golden cross occurs when a short-term moving average breaks above a long-term moving average. Reinforced by high trading volumes, this can signal further gains are in store.
9. A risk to Reward Ratio: Before entering every trade, you must know your pain threshold. You need to figure out what the worst-case scenario is and place your stop based on a monetary or technical level. Every trade, no matter how certain you are of its outcome, is an educated guess. Nothing is certain in trading. Reward, on the other hand, is unknown. When a currency moves, the move can be huge or small. Always trade in 1:2 risks to reward ratio. So if you lose two trade you, your one profit trade can recover your loss and put you in no loss- no profit situation.
10. Never Risk more than 5\% of your investment: If you are a trader with the low budget in rang $100-$1000. Never put more than %5 of your total amount of investment. And if you have budget more than $1000 than please don’t get greedy and don’t put more than 2% on risk.
submitted by sannidhyammf to u/sannidhyammf [link] [comments]

Top Forex Trading tips and Strategies- 2018

Forex trading is completely bounded by the economy of the currency pair. Forex trading is not a kind of business where you can take spontaneous decisions to run your business. It needs a thoughtful and strategic process with the emotional discipline to make any move in Forex trading. It is always said that a Forex trader must strive to develop his/her own trading strategy or try a strategy that has proven itself in past. Best Forex trading tips and strategies for 2018 can develop after multifaceted analysis of currency pairs and economy news. Here are some forex currency trading tips that will work in 2018:
1. Trading is an Art, not a Rocket Science:
You must remember that trading is an art, not a rocket science. No one can assure you for 100% accurate movement of any currency. Therefore, no rule in trading is ever absolute. You have to learn Art of trading. How the market reacts to the economic news? And how technical indicators work with those data?
2. Emotional Discipline:
Everyone knows about emotional discipline, but no one controls their emotions while trading which becomes a reason for the loss of trading. Emotional discipline keeps you on the track of successful trader. If you are trading with a strategic process and don’t have the emotional discipline you can lose your money on trading and we suggest you stop wasting time in trading. You can do more interesting in your life.
3. Don’t Get Greedy:
Forex trading is highly fluctuating trading system. You are making a good profit 1 min ago and next min you are having a loss. If you’re in profit and you are making good money with respect to your investment. Then don’t get greedy into making more profit. Just close the trade and have fun with your profit.
4. Risk Management:
Most of the people trade without risk management and wipe out their account. If you want to be a successful trader don’t forget to put proper risk to management in your trades. Trading is a kind of business if you are not able to lose money that you are investing. Please don’t put any trade in stocks, currency market.
5. RSI (Relative Strength Index) Indicator:
As you know it is a momentum indicator. It is used to understand the movement of the market. It also helps us to learn the trend of the market in particular time frame. But why we are suggesting to others to use in your toolkit. We know that market is run by investors and all investors need something to predict short terms and long-term movement of the market to make a good amount of profit. That’s why they use tools used by a majority of traders and RSI is one of the tools which is used by the majority.
6. ATR (Average True Range):
Most of the traders lose money in Forex trading not because they are trading against the trend, they lose money because they don’t what is stop loss and take profit they have to put while trading and ATR will help you to use a proper stop loss on your all trade so you can increase the number of profitable trade in your portfolio.
7. Stochastic Oscillator
Every trader must keep this tool in his/her toolkit. This tool will let you know about get-in and get-out price of your trade. If you are following the signals provided by this tool, you may lose most of your trades with good profit. It shows the overbought and oversold price of any currency, commodity, and stock. This range – from 0 to 100 – will remain constant, no matter how quickly or slowly a security advances or declines. Considering the most traditional settings for the oscillator, 20 are typically considered the oversold threshold and 80 are considered the overbought threshold. However, the levels are adjustable to fit security characteristics and analytical needs. Readings above 80 indicate a security is trading near the top of its high-low range; readings below 20 indicate the security is trading near the bottom of its high-low range.
8. Simple Moving Average:
The thing to remember about SMA is it helps you to determine the upcoming trend. It helps you to know upcoming the bullish trend and bearish trends in your currency trading.
Two popular trading patterns that use simple moving averages include the death cross and a golden cross. A death cross occurs when the 50-day simple moving average crosses below the 200-day moving average. This is considered a bearish signal that further losses are in store. The golden cross occurs when a short-term moving average breaks above a long-term moving average. Reinforced by high trading volumes, this can signal further gains are in store.
9. A risk to Reward Ratio:
Before entering every trade, you must know your pain threshold. You need to figure out what the worst-case scenario is and place your stop based on a monetary or technical level. Every trade, no matter how certain you are of its outcome, is an educated guess. Nothing is certain in trading. Reward, on the other hand, is unknown. When a currency moves, the move can be huge or small. Always trade in 1:2 risks to reward ratio. So if you lose two trade you, your one profit trade can recover your loss and put you in no loss- no profit situation.
10. Never Risk more than 5\% of your investment:
If you are a trader with the low budget in rang $100-$1000. Never put more than %5 of your total amount of investment. And if you have budget more than $1000 than please don’t get greedy and don’t put more than 2% on risk.
If you remember this rules and learn to use above mention tools properly. Definitely, you can make a good amount of money from your trades, without wiping out your account. Trading is subject to market risk. You can lose all money, so please trade safely and don’t get emotional.
submitted by sannidhyammf to u/sannidhyammf [link] [comments]

Set Stop loss using ATR indicator ( Step by step guide) How to Use the ATR as a Trailing Stop ☝️ - YouTube How to Use ATR Indicator to Set Stoploss - YouTube How to use the ATR Indicator to Improve your Forex Entries ... How to Use ATR Indicator to Set Stoploss (MY APPROACH ... ATR Trading Strategy - The Best Stop Loss Indicator Out ... How to Use the Average True Range (ATR) To Set Stops ...

Learn how to use ATR stop loss in your trading from a fellow trader. Below, is his personal experience on this underrated Topic. “One of the swing trades in Forex I did last month was buying the Canadian dollar against the Japanese Yen. It was a promising trade, having a high reward, low risk ratio (RR) of almost 9:1! Shortly after opening the position though, my stop loss was hit. Should I ... ATR Strategy – How to Use the ATR in Forex Trading. This is the second article in our ATR series. If you haven’t already we suggest that your check out the first article about the ATR Indicator. In that article, we covered the background of the “Average True Range”, or “ATR”, indicator, how it is calculated, and how it looks on a chart. Traders rarely use the indicator to discern ... In forex trading, a stop loss refers to a predetermined level at which you are supposed to exit a losing trade. The stop loss level is usually determined as soon as you enter into the position. The stop loss level is important in forex trading because it is the protection you have against sharp market movements against your open position. In forex trading, a stop loss – which is also known as a stop order or a stop-loss order – is a computer-activated trade tool allowed by most brokers.. It is an emergency instruction to your broker, telling them to exit a trade when it reaches a specified price. The purpose of a forex stop loss is to reduce a trader’s losses if the market changes in an unfavourable direction. You can use Bollinger Bands to give you an idea of how volatile the market is right now. This can be particularly useful if you are doing some range trading. Simply set your stop beyond the bands. If price hits this point, it means volatility is picking up and a breakout could be in play. Method #2: Average True Range (ATR) Many day traders use the ATR to figure out where to put their trailing stop loss. At the time of a trade, look at the current ATR reading. A rule of thumb is to multiply the ATR by two to determine a reasonable stop loss point. So if you're buying a stock, you might place a stop loss at a level twice the ATR below the entry price. If you're ... The ATR % stop method in forex trading Upon searching for the term at Google, Investopedia’s article came up. So, let’s see how I should have used the ATR stop method on this particular trade. How to use the ATR indicator to measure stop loss placement. 2. How to use the ATR indicator to measure profit targets. The Average True Range strategy can be successfully applied to any intraday time frames and bigger time frames. It can also work on different asset classes. The main idea behind the Average True Range Trading strategy is we only want to trade when the market is ready to ... It is highly recommended to use a stop loss strategy in Forex trading. As soon as you have mastered the ability to determine key levels, you are able to define price action strategies, you can effectively use an appropriate risk-reward ratio, and you are able to use confluence to your advantage, an effective FX stop-loss strategy is what is necessary in taking your trading to the next level ... In this article, we’ll discuss how the ATR can help improve your trading and how to use ATR as a stop loss. Stop-loss or sl in forex represents allowed risk for each trade. Size/range of the ATR . As the range varies, it is important to take a designated value as a measure of market volatility. For this, the generally accepted practice is to adapt the best of these: current high less the ...

[index] [6038] [7810] [995] [8947] [17089] [12965] [7335] [10669] [21915] [15962]

Set Stop loss using ATR indicator ( Step by step guide)

The formula for Stop Loss using ATR value. To BUY “Current price – ATR value = Stop loss”. For SELL “Current price + ATR value = Stop loss”. What is ATR or Average True Range indicator ... Check Mark's Premium Course: https://price-action-trading.teachable.com/ 📞 Join Mark's TradersMastermind: https://www.tradersmastermind.com/mastermind Pl... #forex #forexlifestyle #forextrader Want to join the A1 Trading Team? See trades taken by our top trading analysts, join our live trading chatroom, and acces... ATR or Average True Range, is one of the most useful Indicator out there. Download Official Trading Rush APP (Thanks): https://bit.ly/tradingrushapp Support ... JOIN MY ACADEMY Income-Mentor-Box https://www.incomementorbox.com/ 👉Income Mentor Box read FULL Review http://www.investing-news.net/income-mentor-box-d... How to Calculate ATR and use it as a Stop Loss. http://www.financial-spread-betting.com/course/technical-analysis.html PLEASE LIKE AND SHARE THIS VIDEO SO WE... Have you ever put on a trade only to watch the market hit your stop loss, and then continue moving in your expected direction?It sucks, right?And that’s beca...

https://arab-binary-option.downposochedorkyou.tk